March-April 2019 Newsletter

From The Grand Knight 

Tell the Senate to reject religious tests for judicial nominees 

Recent nominees to the federal judiciary have endured pointed questions about their faith during confirmation hearings and in written questionnaires. One Catholic nominee was told, “The dogma lives loudly in you, and that’s of concern.” Others have been interrogated about their membership in the Knights of Columbus, with the implication that participation in the largest Catholic fraternal organization in the country – one that has accomplished so much good for over a century – could be dis-qualifying. To call out the Knights of Columbus for derision is simply appalling. 

Religious tests are unconstitutional and unjust, and they are an attack on all people of faith. Religion inspires people to serve their neighbors by living out their faith in their local communi-ties. Yet religious tests tell not only Catholics, but all Americans, that they cannot both serve their country and live out their faith. These attitudes may have prevailed at points in America’s history, but they should not find new life in this country’s future. 

Our country is highly pluralistic and, currently, highly polarized. Imposing religious tests on judicial nominees deepens the divides in this country and fosters resentment. A religious test says, “You do not belong here. You are not a true American.” Sena-tors should be working to navigate our country through these tumultuous times, not actively working to intensify the waves. 

It is time for these discriminatory, anti-Catholic questions to stop. 

Contact your senators today! 

Background: 

www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/religious-liberty/upload/Abp-Kurtz-Letter-to-Senate-No-Religious-Test-for-Judicial-Nominees-February-2019.pdf 

https://www.religiousfreedominstitute.org/news/press-release-no-religious-test

Note: This message was taken from KofC Supreme website 

From the Chaplin

“The Heart of a Priest”
We might as well say February is the month of the heart. We celebrate Valentine’s Day on Feb 14, the date commemorated as the martyred death of St. Valentine. The heart has become the symbol of love. The heart can also symbolize mercy and charity. One of the earliest visual depictions of the heart is in a painting done by the artist Giotti in 1305 of Charity, in the embodiment of a woman, handing her heart over to Christ. This de-piction is in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua, Italy. Charity, handing her heart over to Christ. How fitting this is since probably the most charitable group in the world, our Knights of Columbus, founded by a most charitable priest, Fr. Michael J. McGivney, have been entrusted to sponsor the American tour of the incorrupt heart of another priest of supreme charity, St. John Vianney. St. Vianney’s most charitable contribution was that of nurturing souls within the sacrament of confession. Confession, where we unload our hearts of the burden of guilt of our sins to a priest, is where this saint excelled by encouraging the faithful. People would come from all around Europe to receive his compassion and mercy in the confessional, which could go as long as 18 hours a day. This is by far one of the most important roles of a priest. To nurture his faithful’s spiritual needs, through trust, patience, compassion, mercy and charity. Aren’t these all the qualities we allegorically associate with the heart? In a cold world, where do we expect to find these attributes if not in our priests? We must not forget that we Disciples of Christ are the common priesthood.
We can only hope to follow in the footsteps of this early 19th century priest, St. John Vianney, who gave the example of what the heart of a priest should be, Incorrupt.

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